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Keyword: Black Sufferings

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Main Stories

Muhammad Ali: boxing legend, human rights activist

Khadijah Ali

Ramadan 26, 14372016-07-01

Muhammad Ali was not only a world-class boxer, he was also a human rights activist and stood against the immoral Vietnam War and refused to fight there for which the US establishment punished him. In death, however, they eulogized him because he had become an international icon.

Malcolm X at Queens College (May 5, 1960)

Malcolm X (Malik el-Shabazz)

Shawwal 22, 13891970-01-01

One who practices this Divine Obedience is called a Muslim, commonly known, spelled, and referred to here in the West as Moslem. There are over 600 million Muslims on this earth, predominantly in Africa and Asia, and we here in America under the Divine Guidance of Mr. Elijah Muhammad are an integral part of the vast World of Islam that stretches from the China Seas to the sunny shores of West Africa.

Malcolm X at Bayard Rustin Debate (November, 1960)

Malcolm X (Malik el-Shabazz)

Shawwal 22, 13891970-01-01

In the past two years, the Honorable Elijah Muhammad has become the most talked about black man in America because he is having such miraculous success in getting his program over among the so-called Negro masses. Time magazine last year wrote that he has eliminated from among his followers alcohol, dope addiction, profanity—all of which stems from disrespect of self.

Eleanor Fischer interviews Malcolm X 
(1961)

Malcolm X (Malik el-Shabazz)

Shawwal 22, 13891970-01-01

Well, any form of integration, forced integration, any effort to force integration upon whites is actually hypocritical. It is a form of hypocrisy involved. If a white man puts his arm around me voluntarily, that’s brotherhood. But if you hold a gun on him and make him embrace me and pretend to be friendly or brotherly toward me, then that’s not brotherhood, that’s hypocrisy.

Malcolm X at Harvard Law School Forum (March 24, 1961)

Malcolm X (Malik el-Shabazz)

Shawwal 22, 13891970-01-01

As students, scholars, professors and scientists you should be well aware that we are living in a world and at a time when great changes are taking place. New ideas are replacing the old ones. Old governments are collapsing, and new nations are being born. The entire “old system” which has held the Old World together has lost its effectiveness, and now that Old World is going out. A new system or New World must replace the Old World.

Malcolm X at Open Mind Roundtable (October 15, 1961)

Malcolm X (Malik el-Shabazz)

Shawwal 22, 13891970-01-01

Yes, I think there is a new so-called Negro. We don’t recognize the term “Negro” but I really believe that there’s a new so-called Negro here in America. He not only is impatient. Not only is he dissatisfied, not only is he disillusioned, but he’s getting very angry.

Malcolm X at Yale Law School (October 20, 1962)

Malcolm X (Malik el-Shabazz)

Shawwal 22, 13891970-01-01

The Western World finds itself today constantly engulfed in crisis after crisis. The ingredients for disaster lurk constantly on all sides...both at home and abroad. The Western World’s leading diplomats are whispering in the halls of the UN that catastrophe can come any moment, any hour, any second.

Malcolm X on Twenty Million Black People in a Political, Economic, and Mental Prison (January 23, 1963)

Malcolm X (Malik el-Shabazz)

Shawwal 22, 13891970-01-01

When I pointed out that there are two kinds of Negroes—some Negroes don’t want a Black man to speak for them. That type of Negro doesn’t even want to be Black. He’s ashamed of being Black. And you’ll never hear him refer to himself as Black. Now that type we don’t pretend to speak for. You can speak for him. In fact you can have him.

Alex Haley Interviews Malcolm X (May, 1963)

Malcolm X (Malik el-Shabazz)

Shawwal 22, 13891970-01-01

The brainwashed black man can never learn to stand on his own two feet until he is on his own. We must learn to become our own producers, manufacturers and traders; we must have industry of our own, to employ our own. The white man resists this because he wants to keep the black man under his thumb and jurisdiction in white society. He wants to keep the black man always dependent and begging—for jobs, food, clothes, shelter, education.

Malcolm X on The Black Revolution (June, 1963)

Malcolm X (Malik el-Shabazz)

Shawwal 22, 13891970-01-01

First, however, there are some questions we have to put to you. Since the black masses here in America are now in open revolt against the American system of segregation, will these same black masses turn toward integration or will they turn toward complete separation? Will these awakened black masses demand integration into the white society that enslaved them or will they demand complete separation from that cruel white society that has enslaved them?

Malcolm X on The Ballot or the Bullet (April 3, 1964)

Malcolm X (Malik el-Shabazz)

Shawwal 22, 13891970-01-01

Whether you’re educated or illiterate, whether you live on the boulevard or in the alley, you’re going to catch hell just like I am. We’re all in the same boat and we all are going to catch the same hell from the same man. He just happens to be a white man. All of us have suffered here, in this country, political oppression at the hands of the white man, economic exploitation at the hands of the white man, and social degradation at the hands of the white man.

Malcolm X on The Old Negro and the New Negro (September, 1963)

Malcolm X (Malik el-Shabazz)

Shawwal 22, 13891970-01-01

They kidnapped us and brought us here; they deprived us of our rights; they made us slaves; they sold our people from one plantation to another, from one auction block to another. And even right now, 1963, they have to confess they are still depriving the black people here in America, not only of civil rights, but even of human rights.

Malcolm X at UC Berkeley (October 11, 1963)

Malcolm X (Malik el-Shabazz)

Shawwal 22, 13891970-01-01

We see the increase of racial animosity, the increase of racial hostility, and the increase of outright racial hatred. We see masses of Black people who have lost all confidence in the false promises of the hypocritical white politicians. We see masses of Black people who are thoroughly fed up with the deceit of the so-called white liberals, or the white so-called liberals.

Malcolm X on A Message to the Grassroots (November 10, 1963)

Malcolm X (Malik el-Shabazz)

Shawwal 22, 13891970-01-01

Not only does America have a very serious problem, but our people have a very serious problem. America’s problem is us. We’re her problem. The only reason she has a problem is she doesn’t want us here. And every time you look at yourself, be you black, brown, red, or yellow, a so-called Negro, you represent a person who poses such a serious problem for America because you’re not wanted.

Malcolm X at Columbia University (November 20, 1963)

Malcolm X (Malik el-Shabazz)

Shawwal 22, 13891970-01-01

One of the reasons that this religion is the only cure is because we believe that it’s just the plain naked truth, and one of the causes of our ailments in this part of the world is our lack of exposure to truth during the 400 years that we’ve been here. We believe that most of what Negroes have been taught in America is lies, deliberately concocted lies, scientifically told lies.

Malcolm X on God's Judgement of White America (December 4, 1963)

Malcolm X (Malik el-Shabazz)

Shawwal 22, 13891970-01-01

White America should be asking herself: "What does God want for these twenty-two million ex-slaves?" Who will make White America know what God wants? Who will present God's plan to White America? What is God's solution to the problem caused by the presence of twenty-two million unwanted slaves here in America? And who will present God's solution?

Malcolm X's Speech to Civil Rights Workers from Mississippi (Jan. 1, 1965)

Malcolm X (Malik el-Shabazz)

Shawwal 22, 13891970-01-01

So my experience has been that in many instances where you find Negroes always talking about being nonviolent, they’re not nonviolent with each other, and they’re not loving with each other, or patient with each other, or forgiving with each other. Usually, when they say they’re nonviolent, they mean they’re nonviolent with somebody else. I think you understand what I mean.

Malcolm X on Prospects for Freedom in 1965 (January 7, 1965)

Malcolm X (Malik el-Shabazz)

Shawwal 22, 13891970-01-01

The people in this country who in the past have been at peace and have been peaceful were that way only because they didn't know what freedom was. They let somebody else define it for them, but today, 1965, you find those who have not had freedom, and were not in a position to define freedom, are beginning to define it for themselves.

Pierre Berton interviews Malcolm X (January 19, 1965)

Malcolm X (Malik el-Shabazz)

Shawwal 22, 13891970-01-01

Well, I think that the only way that two different races can get along with each other is, first, they have to understand each other. That cannot be brought about other than through communication, dialogue—and you can’t communicate with a person unless you speak his language. If the person speaks French, you can’t speak English or German.

Malcolm X on Afro-American History (January 24, 1965)

Malcolm X (Malik el-Shabazz)

Shawwal 22, 13891970-01-01

It’s impossible for you and me to have a balanced mind in this society without going into the past, because in this particular society, as we function and fit into it right now, we’re such an underdog, we’re trampled upon, we’re looked upon as almost nothing. Now if we don’t go into the past and find out how we got this way, we will think that we were always this way.

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